coaching, homework, reading and writing skills

Help your child develop phonics skills and they learn to read for pleasure


reading

Why reading for pleasure helps your child

There is good evidence to suggest that young people who read for pleasure daily perform better in reading skills tests than those who never do. However, a recent survey carried out by the National Literacy Trust has indicated a decline in the amount of time children and young people spend reading for pleasure. Here are some ways to help your child read more if they are reluctant to read.

What are the benefits of reading for pleasure?

  • Pupils who say they enjoy reading for pleasure are more likely to score well on reading assessments compared to pupils who said they enjoyed reading less
  • There is some evidence to show that reading for pleasure is a more important determinant of children’s educational success than their family’s socio-economic status
  • It can have a positive impact on pupils’ emotional and social behaviour
  • It can have a positive impact on text, comprehension, and grammar.

How do you improve a child’s independent reading?

  • An important factor in developing reading for pleasure is providing choice – choice and interest are highly related
  • Parents and the home environment are essential to the early teaching of reading and fostering a love of reading; children are more likely to continue to be readers in homes where books and reading are valued
  • Reading for pleasure is strongly influenced by relationships between teachers and children, and children and families.

First learn how reading works so you can read easily.

High quality phonics teaching gives children a solid base on which to build as they progress through school. Children who master the mechanics of reading are well-placed to go on to develop a love of reading. The English Education Department is pushing phonics in schools and has established a phonics screening check for all students after year one. Here is further information about why they are spending so much money and energy on doing this.

Schools in New Zealand have also begun to teach phonics again the last few years. As a parent or grandparent you can make a big difference in a child’s ability to read easily and also to spell easily by making sure they understand the sound-letter relationships in words and teaching them phonics.

Make it fun and they learn faster. Play games with them so they they stay focused and interested, then they learn faster. For example you can play the game I invented with a six year old boy many years ago now. When you play The Weird Word Game  they will learn while they are competing with you.

I’m working in partnership with you the reader and I like to know what you are thinking! Please feel free to write your thoughts, questions, and comments at the bottom of this page. 

Follow me if you like this post and want to know more about how you can develop strengths in your child with minimum fuss and effort. You won’t be flooded with emails. I only write every week or so. 

I like to share my coaching ideas with as many people as possible, so please Tweet this post or follow me on Twitter; and share this post and the excellyourchild.com website with other like-minded families.

 

Warmly,

Anne

coaching, homework, reading and writing skills, Uncategorized

Reading – how to help your child read well and with pleasure


helping your child read

Check out this blog by a mother of 9 titled  ‘raising children is not a default chore is inspiring. As parents living in a society with many pressures brought to bear on us to be so much more than good parents, we need all the inspiration we can gather to stay focused on remembering what is really important in our lives, and to place that first. You can do this even while you are working outside the home, have little money, have many other responsibilities You just have to plan a little smarter.Write to me if you’d like to share your difficulties and triumphs. I’m there for you.

I encourage you to persevere every possible day to support your children to grow their knowledge and skills. I specifically talk about developing educational skills in my posts but if you look a little more deeply, I’m also talking about developing their emotional/social skills and although I’m not specifically targeting these areas, I encourage you to develop your children’s spirituality and physical skills as well. Strengths in all areas help them develop into strong and loving humans, and today more than ever we certainly need more of those qualities in people around us.

In the last post on reading I discussed how reading is still an important skill in your child’s future life as an adult as well as for their success at school I also suggested ways to work with their reluctance to read.

As  responsible parents we make sure that our child reads the books sent home from school. Perhaps they drone on, reading all the words more or less correctly, but they may find the whole reading process boring…and maybe you find it boring as well. And if it is boring, they will switch off and read automatically, and not really understand and remember the story the next day.

We can so easily make reading practice  something that is compulsory and important, but not fun. If something is not interesting in some way, we do not remember it later, or value it, so why should our children? Check out this post for  more information on how our children can learn and remember more easily.

Today I want to talk about the power of share-reading with your child. Share-reading is when you each take turns reading part or all of a sentence, a paragraph, or a page out loud. I suggest that you read little and swop turns often, and then your child will stay fully engaged, because soon it will be their turn. They will also be more likely to be interested in what they are reading if you are very interested, and if you also discuss it with them.

 Share- reading is fun!

You not only take your turn to read with enthusiasm and understanding, you also discuss difficult word meanings, what is happening in the story, and ideas that pop up because of the story.

  • Age does not matter. Teens can also enjoy share-reading. Share-read a book they want to read but that is a little difficult for them to read and understand.
    When it is their turn use Pause, Prompt, Praise.

    • Pause. Sit back and let your child attempt to the phonics rules and the meaning of the sentence to read unknown words. You can count up to 5 elephants (approx 5 seconds) before giving them a prompt.
    • Prompt them. Remind them to read what is there, or read the sounds from the beginning to the end of the word. Next ask them for a word that makes sense in the sentence and with the sounds they have just read.
    • Praise them. Tell them what they did right. My favourite one is to say enthusiastically, “Good reading.”

When it is your turn to read – read slowly, enthusiastically, and with expression. Move your finger along the line as you are reading if your child finds it difficult to track words, and make sure your child’s eye is following the words as you read them, or don’t use your finger if they don’t need that support and track words well. Stop reading unexpectedly (in the middle of a sentence for instance), expecting your child to immediately pick up from where you were.

Reading is to be enjoyed! It is not how many pages you read, it is how much you enjoy and understand the story. Spend time discussing what is happening in the story with your child so they read more thoughtfully, and actually understand all the hard words they are reading.

I’m working in partnership with you the reader and I like to know what you are thinking! Please feel free to write your thoughts, questions, and comments at the bottom of this page. 

Follow me if you like this post and want to know more about how you can develop strengths in your child with minimum fuss and effort. You won’t be flooded with emails. I only write every week or so. 

I like to share my coaching ideas with as many people as possible, so please Tweet this post or follow me on

Twitter; and share this post and the excellyourchild.com website with other like-minded families.

Warmly,

Anne

coaching, learning and remembering, reading and writing skills

Reading – it’s important: Help your child read more often.


helping my child read

Is your child reading regularly?

If not, what is stopping them from choosing to read?

You might think they don’t read often because of all the electronic gadgets they use, or that they prefer sports, or that they have never been good at reading….But they are still not enough reasons to not read. Do you agree? You might believe as I do that reading regularly – anything that is well-written which includes comics and magazines – will help your child do better in life as well as at school. Definitely they learn a lot about other people and other places when they read regularly. Let us look at what you can do to change what stops them from reading.

They prefer using electronic gadgets. Limit their use! Fads in areas such as computer games, apps, and social media sites, come and go, as you may have noticed, with dismaying speed. Fluent reading is still a core skill  that enriches our lives and makes them easier, and will probably continue to be a crucial skill for your children as adults. The rule ‘ work first play after’ is important for us as adults when we want to do well in life. Learning is your child’s work. Teach them to ‘read first play later’. I have seen many reluctant readers  eventually prefer to read because they see reading as play. You as their parent just have to decide that reading is what you want them to do Then you can negotiate with them, and make sure they do read as agreed. I also suggest that you regularly show interest in the story they are currently reading (I often read it ahead of them).

They prefer to be active rather than sit and read. Many of us do. However, interests and work they choose to pursue in life probably requires a competent level of reading and writing skill. Don’t you agree? I believe from my experiences as a coach that children who don’t seem to be able to sit still can be taught that skill. You might notice that your child is quite still when focused on something they find totally fascinating. I fully expect that they will learn to sit still and concentrate on their learning too. I keep their work interesting and challenging and exciting, and I use versions of games that monitor and reward their concentration such as the first up to five game. I no longer believe that a child can’t learn to sit still  and concentrate on their work for a period of time.

Reading has always been difficult for them. Many children are reluctant to read, often because they found it hard to learn that skill when they were younger. Many children didn’t have enough practise at developing strong phonics skills, which is how letters relate to particular sounds, so they often had difficulty learning to both read and spell.  It is very important that your child masters the letter-sound relationships (or phonics) when reading and spelling unknown words. A fun and fast way to teach your child reading and spelling skills is using  The Weird Word Game. 

My next post on reading will give you some easy ways to help your child read, and enjoy reading.

I like to share my coaching ideas with as many people as possible so hello fellow Twitter user! Don’t forget to Tweet this post if you like it, or follow me on Twitter if you find me interesting. Keep spreading my ideas and share this post and the excellyourchild.com website with other like-minded families so they too can develop the skills to create exceptional students in their families.

Warmly,

Anne